Friday, 24 November 2017

Forbidden - Prologue

Forbidden | Fiction / Historical
by Victoria Hinton


A click! It echoed loudly through the dark corridor of the great house. Her door was locked once again; for how long, no one knew. This time it was worse. Her husband’s rage had terrified every living soul in that house. Their small son sat under his bed, his hands over his ears, but it didn’t block out his father’s shouting or the sound of his fists hitting his mother. To this child, however, what he heard and sometimes saw was normal. His father had told him over and over his mother deserved it; surely what he had done was justified.
This time Mrs Geraldine Lockland had been with child. Six months into her pregnancy. There was no doubt in anyone’s mind that the child was now lost. When she had carried her first child, her son, Jonathan, Mr Albert Lockland had not laid a hand upon his wife. Those nine months were the longest Geraldine had ever gone without being beaten. Everyone prayed and hoped it would be the same this time, with her second pregnancy. She had been looking so well, the child was growing strong inside her and Albert had, up until that night, left his wife alone.

Friday, 20 October 2017

Tempt Not the Stars - Chapter 4

Tempt Not the Stars | Crime Detective Mystery
by Julius Falconer

It is not my purpose, you may be glad to hear, to describe in detail the events of the house-party held at Abberton Hall on the weekend of 27-28 February 1965. Young people’s parties are, to my elderly and perhaps cynical way of thinking, both predictable and tedious: trivial conversation, alcohol and flirtation, all in immoderate amounts; erratic consumption of sustenance and snatches of sleep; loud music (if music is the right word for the cacophony and inconsequence that young people seem to enjoy); disorder and jumble on the ground. This sum of frivolity known as partying, with its stupefying convention and obligatory hang-over, is perhaps relatively harmless in the spectrum of all possible human activity, but it does not make for a thought-provoking read except in the hands of a practised novelist – ahem.

Thursday, 21 September 2017

Chasin’ That Carrot - Chapter 1

Chasin’ That Carrot | Fiction
by Avril Dalziel Saunders


It was the evening of Saturday 11th October 1969, Linda, closed her eyes and took a deep breath; she felt secure as her new husband James stood behind her and wrapped his strong arms round her. He took the big knife, placed it in her right hand and firmly wrapped his hand over hers then to loud claps and cheers from family and guests, they cut the top tier of their wedding cake. She was brimming over with happiness as she turned her head to look up at James; she thought how tall and handsome he looked with his dark wavy hair and wide smile. It was strange to think that she was no longer a MacGregor but she was proud to be the wife of James Alexander.

Saturday, 26 August 2017

A Ticket to Tewkesbury - Chapter One

A Ticket to Tewkesbury | Fiction: Espionage / Crime Detective Mystery
by Neal James

Julie Martin’s aunt Molly was seventy-four when she died in April 1992 and it had fallen to her to take care of the old woman’s affairs at the end. She’d hated doing it when her own parents passed away some years before, and the fact that Molly had been her own mother’s identical twin sister didn’t help matters at all. It had been like living through the whole episode once more and although her husband Doug was as supportive as he could be, he had no real idea of the emotional turmoil that she had gone through during the weeks following the funeral. As sole executor of her aunt’s will it had been Julie’s responsibility to ensure that all bequests and instructions were carried out, but the most difficult side to it all had been sorting through Molly’s possessions. There had been all of the usual collections of memorabilia which she had accumulated, in addition to papers concerning the ownership of her house and all her savings, but the more personal items were confined to the recesses of her wardrobe, and that was where Julie found the letter.

Friday, 23 June 2017

In The Beginning

No Cousin of Mine | History
by Derek Smith


The young man sat with his back to the engine of a train heading north from a large midland city. As he had waited on the platform, he had been sure that he would not have been the only one from a city with a population of over a million to be making the same journey that day to the same destination, and confidently expected to see others of about his age waiting for the same train.  Like him, they would have been told that they were to bring only a holdall or a small case containing just a change of underwear and basic toiletries. He had seen no one of this description who appeared to be making the same journey, and so he was now travelling alone in an otherwise empty compartment.

Friday, 26 May 2017

In the blink of an eye | Playing Havoc

Playing Havoc | Fiction: Thriller / Suspense
by Steve Morris

Thursday 19:00 hours

“Oi! Giles!”
It was old Trevor’s voice shouting me again from the top of our steep little road of seven houses. I turned around.
“Giles! Summat’s come down! Up ‘ere,” he beckoned, “The lad in the next street’s just got back home. He reckons a plane’s come down!”
I met him halfway up the bank. Trevor was desperate to tell everyone in our road. Not used to moving so quickly he was almost out of breath. A pinch of salt was often needed here. Both he and his mate were eccentrics if I was to describe them politely. I was never going to take either of them seriously.

Friday, 21 April 2017

Murder in Whitechapel

Jack the Ripper – Through the mists of time | History, Crime | 
by Peter Hodgson | 

All five murders occurred in Spitalfields and Whitechapel in a ten-week period and in an area covering approximately one square mile. There were two other murders previous to that of Nichols which were thought to be the work of the Ripper due to the terrible injuries sustained by the victims.
On 2 April, Bank Holiday Monday, that same year, a 45-year-old prostitute by the name of Emma Elizabeth Smith was attacked in the early hours of the morning as she travelled home along Osborne Street. She had been followed by three men who seized the woman, beat her up and then robbed her. She managed to reach her home on George Street and from there she was taken to the London Hospital where she died three days later . A few months later, on Bank Holiday Monday, 6 August, 39-year-old Martha Tabram and her friend, Mary Connolly (nicknamed ‘Pearly Poll’), went out in the evening for drinks and a good time.